Most recent posts

  • 05/09/18
    I was walking on a bluff overlooking Lake Michigan just before sunset when the peaceful lapping of the waves was interrupted by what sounded like a swarm of angry bees. The hum alternately grew louder then faded. Glancing up, I saw not a swarm of bees but a hovering camera, held aloft by four vertical propellers, with blinking red and green lights. A drone. It was my first close encounter with one of the tiny airships and it prompted me to do a little reading about the phenomenon of private...more...
  • Guest blog
    05/09/18
    I recently found myself feeling incredibly energized and inspired. I had hung up the phone after having a consultative conversation with two nursing leaders about a charge nurse leadership program I developed and implemented. Rather than them thanking me for the advice and direction I had provided, I found myself thanking them. They helped me remember my overarching vision for how I hope the work I do, day in and day out, will someday impact the broader vision of developing emotionally healthy...more...
  • 05/02/18
    Nurses have always been role models, and we have the numbers to prove it. A recent Gallup poll showed that the American public views nursing as the most ethical profession for the 16th year in a row. That’s because nurses are viewed not only as caregivers, but also as teachers, companions and cheerleaders.more...
  • 04/30/18
    Many clinicians, myself included, recall CMS’ Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) formula and Congress’ two decades of intervention to stop reimbursement decreases. In 2015, the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA) replaced the SGR formula with two tracks to choose from in CMS’ Quality Payment Program: the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) and Advanced Alternative Payment Models (APMs).more...
  • Guest blog
    04/25/18
    It's 6:45 p.m., near the end of your third 12-hour shift in a row. The night shift will be arriving any second, and then you are off for four days. You decide to round on your patients one final time before report. more...
  • Guest blog
    04/20/18
    In 1974, a groundbreaking article by Dr. Charles E. Butterworth, Jr. described malnutrition as “the skeleton in the hospital closet” because it so often went undetected and untreated. Sadly, more than 40 years later, contemporary authors similarly describe malnutrition as a silent epidemic. Reports today show that 20 to 50 percent of hospitalized patients are malnourished upon admission.more...
  • 04/17/18
    You may remember the classic American film, “Field of Dreams,” starring Kevin Costner and James Earl Jones. In the movie, Ray Kinsella (Costner), an Iowa farmer, hears a voice whispering, “If you build it, he will come.” As the story develops, the whispering voice morphs into visions of a need for Ray to turn a portion of his cornfield into a baseball field so star players from yesteryear can return and relive their dreams. After the first player arrives, he asks Ray if...more...
  • 04/10/18
    Is there anything more frightening than the image of a young toddler running while holding a pair of scissors? From the time we were old enough to pull ourselves up on the edge of the couch and take our first staggering steps, our mothers warned us to never run with scissors. Some health care providers are determined to take on incidence risk in the form of global spending targets for defined populations, often in the form of accountable care organizations (ACOs), a concept that emerged from...more...
  • 03/20/18
    It was a pleasant surprise to see not one, but two recent commentaries on the subject of biosimilars in prestigious publications such as the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) and the Journal of Clinical Oncology (JCO). Given the novelty and complexity of biosimilars, new commentary in highly regarded clinical journals such as these is important to increasing the level of understanding and confidence necessary to boost adoption by clinicians.  more...
  • 03/19/18
    Patients expect hospitals to be safe places; places of healing, not harm. But those of us in health care know that’s not always the case. Patients experience harm in the course of their care from hospital-acquired conditions (HACs), such as central-line blood stream infections or ventilator-associated pneumonia. The rate of patient harm has been quantified by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality as 115 HACs per 1,000 discharges, according to the 2015 Annual Hospital-...more...