Operations

  • 11/06/18
    My new automobile insurance card arrived in the mail recently. My old card was made of sturdy plastic. The new card was made of paper. As I turned the card over in my hands, hoping that the lightweight construction was not a harbinger of thinner coverage, something caught my eye that made me stop and think. On the back of the card was a code referring to “uninsured motorist” protection. A portion of my auto insurance premium covers me in the event that I am involved in an accident...more...
  • Guest blog
    11/01/18
    Going Lean can be a challenge. After all, it’s a leadership and performance improvement style that may not easily fit within every organization’s management philosophy. Across the country, 75 percent of all health care providers have tried the Lean method and struggled with it. But there are success stories, most recently by leadership at New Hanover Regional Medical Center (NHRMC) in Wilmington, N.C.more...
  • 10/29/18
    Health care organizations collect patient demographic data including race, ethnicity and language (REAL) to fulfill meaningful use attestation, meet federal accreditation requirements and adhere to CLAS standards (Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services). How organizations use this data, however, varies greatly. Many organizations are beginning to use the information with their clinical quality and safety improvement efforts.more...
  • 10/22/18
    In December 1913 Henry Ford introduced the assembly line, revolutionizing the production of automobiles. For the first time, cars moved while the workers and their tools did not. Productivity increased dramatically, as the time required to produce an automobile dropped from 12 hours to two hours. Manufacturing would never be the same. A few weeks later, in February 1914, the Detroit Symphony Orchestra reemerged, having ceased operations in 1910. It’s a good bet that Mr. Ford was...more...
  • 10/17/18
    It seems just like yesterday when then-presidential candidate George H.W. Bush uttered the infamous words, “Read my lips: no new taxes.” What followed was President Bush doing something we rarely see these days – compromising with Congress and the other political party – to negotiate a budget that did, among other things, increase some taxes. Some analysts believe that his seeming failure to keep his word was partly to blame for losing his reelection bid.more...
  • 10/11/18
    I live in a growing and desirable part of southeastern United States. To get just about anywhere by car however I have to drive through rural America. Recently, I stopped at a small, independently owned gas station and noticed something strange behind the counter. There was only one choice of cigarettes. In my experience, tobacco sales were a big business in this part of the country and gas stations made a pretty good margin on every pack sold. I asked the attendant if those were the only...more...
  • 10/01/18
    Just before the financial meltdown of 2008, a neurologist named Michael Burry – who managed an investment hedge fund – foresaw the implosion of the mortgage-backed securities market and began investing heavily in what are known as credit default swaps. For years, banks had been making mortgage loans to people who were borrowing far beyond their means. Lenders were then bundling risky loans into mortgage-backed securities and selling those securities to investors ranging from large...more...
  • Guest blog
    09/19/18
    Walk through any clinical (or even non-clinical) unit in a hospital and you’ll likely see a visual example of how that department highlights and tracks its progress. A popular continuous improvement tool, huddle boards help teams collaborate on the most important tasks and actions in order to provide the highest level of patient care. New Hanover Regional Medical Center is no different.more...
  • 09/18/18
    Health care today looks much different than in the past and leaders at traditional hospitals are finding it necessary to expand their services outside the hospital, particularly into the post-acute and ambulatory care sectors. Expanding services to include other types of care facilities means expanding your supply chain and with that comes complexities, risks and opportunities.more...
  • 09/11/18
    It was reported in March that U.S. consumer credit card debt exceeded $1 trillion for the first time. Just how big is one trillion? A trillion is one million million. It would take 31,709 years to count to one trillion if you didn’t stop to eat or sleep. Imagine your dad back in 1968, piling the family into the station wagon for a road trip to the Grand Canyon. As you pulled out of the driveway, he cheerfully suggested that you count to a trillion as a way to pass the time. Had you stuck...more...