Supply chain

  • 07/07/17
    It is indisputable that Amazon has changed the way American consumers expect to buy things.  We expect immediate price comparison abilities. We can buy and carry an entire bookshelf with us on trips. We can order anything from batteries to clothes to books to groceries (and much more) in a matter of seconds from one website. And often, we get it all delivered with two-day shipping.   But how does that translate to other industries? Especially those as complex as health care?more...
  • 05/31/17
    One thing everyone in health care can agree on is the unprecedented level of uncertainty swirling around our industry. The new administration has promised change for the better, but we don’t yet know what that change will look like or to what extent any new programs will affect the health care modifications already underway. While we wait and speculate, I can pass along some market insights for hospitals, physicians and supply chain leaders on cardiovascular medical devices.more...
  • 05/30/17
    In the past few months, I have received feedback from numerous hospital supply chain leaders on the topic of consultants. A consistent message I hear is that consultants must demonstrate the right skills to meet the needs of the business and also have the right chemistry to fit in with the member’s culture. It brings to mind the children’s fairy tale, Goldilocks and the Three Bears. Goldilocks tries the first bed to discover it's too big, then tries the second bed to find out...more...
  • 05/16/17
    Increasing sustainability practices in health care food service is all the rage right now. Driving the conversation is the obesity epidemic, the effect of meat and dairy production on climate change and the extensive use of non-therapeutic antibiotics in the production of poultry, beef and pork. Adding to the urgency is the increased focus on enhancing the patient experience. In today’s world of quality patient care, food matters. more...
  • 01/23/17
    It’s no surprise that reviewing purchased services contract categories like laundry, medical waste or language interpretation can seem like a daunting task—almost like trying to climb Mount Everest. How you and the group view the mountain is critical. Looking from the foot of the mountain, it might seem impossible. Conversely, looking from a higher vantage point, you would get a different perspective and see how to move around the mountain. It’s all about perspective.more...
  • 11/16/16
    It’s a generally accepted fact that purchased services account for 20 to 30 percent of a hospital’s total expenses. It’s also generally accepted that with more than 300 categories, it’s a largely untapped source of savings across the health care supply chain. And, with contract ownership spread over a multitude of departments in a typical health system, gaining traction around negotiating new agreements is a lot like trying to eat Jell-O with chopsticks—it isn...more...
  • 11/02/16
    Unique device identifiers (UDIs) have begun their integration into hospitals and their supply chains. Supply chain leaders are preparing to take the next step in their journey to ensure patients receive high quality products that improve outcomes – and the government is helping pave the way.more...
  • 09/24/16
    While attending the National Nuclear Security Administration 2016 Mo-99 conference in St. Louis last week, I learned of a report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NAS) citing the 50 percent likelihood of a shortage of molybdenum-99 (Mo-99). Mo-99 is used to produce technetium-99m (Tc-99m), which is used in millions of diagnostic procedures annually.more...
  • 06/03/16
    Each year, the arrival of spring coincides with announcements from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) about proposed changes to hospital inpatient reimbursement policy and rates for the coming year. So while the calendar and weather signal a coming of better things, reading over the Inpatient Prospective Payment System (IPPS) plan for 2017 signals continued turbulence for hospitals.more...
  • 04/13/16
    After years of development, the ABSORB Vascular Bioresorbable Scaffold finally had its day before the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Circulatory System Devices Panel on March 15. The news didn’t disappoint. The panel overwhelmingly recommended that the FDA approve the new device. Now we wait for the FDA to complete its work, which generally takes a few months, and then hopefully the device will become available in the U.S.more...