Clinical

  • Guest blog
    04/20/18
    In 1974, a groundbreaking article by Dr. Charles E. Butterworth, Jr. described malnutrition as “the skeleton in the hospital closet” because it so often went undetected and untreated. Sadly, more than 40 years later, contemporary authors similarly describe malnutrition as a silent epidemic. Reports today show that 20 to 50 percent of hospitalized patients are malnourished upon admission.more...
  • 04/17/18
    You may remember the classic American film, “Field of Dreams,” starring Kevin Costner and James Earl Jones. In the movie, Ray Kinsella (Costner), an Iowa farmer, hears a voice whispering, “If you build it, they will come.” As the story develops, the whispering voice morphs into visions of a need for Ray to turn a portion of his cornfield into a baseball field so star players from yesteryear can return and relive their dreams. After the first player arrives, he asks Ray...more...
  • 03/19/18
    Patients expect hospitals to be safe places; places of healing, not harm. But those of us in health care know that’s not always the case. Patients experience harm in the course of their care from hospital-acquired conditions (HACs), such as central-line blood stream infections or ventilator-associated pneumonia. The rate of patient harm has been quantified by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality as 115 HACs per 1,000 discharges, according to the 2015 Annual Hospital-...more...
  • 03/15/18
    As the U.S. moves toward a pay-for-performance quality and safety model, addressing care for vulnerable populations is vital. Hospitals must now find an effective way to manage both medical and non-medical factors for their patients. However, these non-medical factors are also some of our most pressing social issues: poverty, race, geographic location, and ethnicity and language barriers.more...
  • Sg2, a Vizient company
    03/07/18
    Editor’s note: This post is adapted from an Expert Insight, originally featured on Sg2.com on Feb. 26, 2018.more...
  • 03/05/18
    Depending on context, the word transparency has different meanings. Outside the scope of medicine, it conveys a sense of invisibility. In health care – which is built on the scientific method requiring evidence for decision-making – it bespeaks the ability to see into areas that were previously obscured. For administrators and physicians to make change to improve outcomes, they not only need data, but they also need the ability to have transparent compare groups to ensure apples-to...more...
  • 03/01/18
    Did you know that the percentage of malnutrition cases among hospital patients ranges from 20 to 50 percent? And another one-third of patients can become malnourished while admitted? A variety of controllable and uncontrollable factors may contribute to this, including a patient’s condition, length of stay, unfamiliar surroundings and/or food offerings. All totaled, up to two-thirds of patients can be affected by poor nutritional status when they are discharged.more...
  • 02/21/18
    In the past few years, personal fitness trackers have become all the rage. It's fun to see your daily activity level, sleep quality and heart rate. But, does knowing this data lead to any positive changes? What if the person looking over the data is your caregiver?more...
  • 02/12/18
    With virtually every state experiencing the effects of a rampant flu season, clearly it’s an overwhelming time to work in a hospital, doctor’s office or an outpatient clinic. Being on the front lines of the flu fight, you may not have extra time or energy to keep up with the details of this national story.more...
  • 02/07/18
    It’s not often that a blog broaches the difficult topic of human trafficking. But in my view, the subject is too important not to address since the first step to any change is awareness. The facts are that approximately two million adults and children in the United States are victims of human trafficking. And hospital staff are among the most likely people to encounter this hidden population. Knowing what to ask and what to look for at the point of care can save lives.more...